Portrait of Aaron Burr.

Aaron Burr

February 6, 1756–September 14, 1836

Aaron Burr was a U.S. Senator and Vice President of the United States under Thomas Jefferson.

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Aaron Burr was a U.S. Senator and Vice President of the United States under Thomas Jefferson. Burr killed Alexander Hamilton in an infamous duel in 1804. He was also tried and acquitted of treason against the United States for allegedly trying to establish a separate empire in the southwest.

Quick Facts

  • Born February 6, 1756, in Newark New Jersey.
  • Graduated from Princeton University in 1772.
  • Served in the Continental Army during the American Revolution.
  • Admitted to New York State bar in 1782.
  • Elected to United States Senate in 1791.
  • Tied Thomas Jefferson with 73 Electoral College votes in the presidential election of 1800.
  • Electoral College chose Jefferson over Burr as U.S. President on February 17, 1801.
  • Sworn in as U.S. Vice President on March 4, 1801.
  • Killed Alexander Hamilton in a duel at Weehawken, New Jersey on July 11, 1804.
  • Planned private military operations against Mexico from 1804 through 1806.
  • Tried and acquitted of treason in 1807 for attempting to form a republic in the southwest.
  • Died in Port Richmond, Staten Island, N.Y., September 14, 1836.
  • Buried at Princeton Cemetery, Princeton, N.J.

Famous Quotes

The rule of my life is to make business a pleasure, and pleasure my business.

Never do today what you can as well do tomorrow, because something may occur to make you regret your premature action.

Go West, young man.

 

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Citation Information

The following information is provided for citations.

  • Article Title Aaron Burr
  • Coverage February 6, 1756–September 14, 1836
  • Author
  • Keywords aaron burr, vice president, senator, revolutionary war officer, duel with alexander hamilton, senator
  • Website Name American History Central
  • Access Date May 28, 2022
  • Publisher R.Squared Communications, LLC
  • Original Published Date
  • Date of Last Update May 5, 2022
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