Black and white photograph of Stonewall Jackson.

Confederate General Stonewall Jackson died on May 10, 1863 from wounds he received during the Battle of Chancellorsville

Battle of Chancellorsville External Links

April 30–May 6, 1863

External Links for Battle of Chancellorsville

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Confederate General Stonewall Jackson died on May 10, 1863 from wounds he received during the Battle of Chancellorsville

Battle of Chancellorsville

The legendary "Stonewall" Jackson, renowned as the quintessential grim warrior, revealed his gentler nature on April 20, 1863, at Guinea Station, 12 miles south of Fredericksburg as he greeted his beloved wife and saw his infant daughter for the first time. The blissful family repaired to a nearby house and passed the next nine days enjoying the only domestic contentment they would ever share. In less than three weeks, at a small frame building near Guinea, Jackson would be dead. [For information on Jackson's death in this building,

Chancellorsville

On April 27, Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker led the V, XI, and XII Corps on a campaign to turn the Confederate left flank by crossing the Rappahannock and Rapidan Rivers above Fredericksburg. Passing the Rapidan via Germanna and Ely's Fords, the Federals concentrated near Chancellorsville on April 30 and May 1.

The Battle of Chancellorsville

On April 27, 1863 – three days before the historic Battle of Chancellorsville – Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker led the V, XI, and XII Corps on a campaign to turn the Confederate left flank by crossing the Rappahannock and Rapidan Rivers above Fredericksburg. Passing the Rapidan via Germanna and Ely's Fords, the Federals concentrated near Chancellorsville on April 30 and May 1.

The First Day of Chancellorsville: An Animated Map

An animated map with timeline of the Battle of Chancellorsville. Requires Adobe Flash player.

Chancellorsville

An animated account of the Battle of Chancellorsville. Requires Adobe Flash player.

Battle of Chancellorsville

The Chancellorsville Campaign, which culminated in the Battle of Chancellorsville, fought May 1–6, 1863, produced one of the most stunning and ambivalent Confederate victories of the American Civil War (1861–1865). Confederate general Robert E. Leehad trounced the Army of the Potomac atF redericksburg the previous December, but since then, Joseph Hooker had thoroughly reorganized and revitalized his dispirited Union troops. Declaring that he had created "the finest Army on the Planet," he set into motion an elaborate plan designed to quietly turn the left flank of the outnumbered and underfed Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, which was camped not far from Fredericksburg.

Chancellorsville

On April 27, Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker led the V, XI, and XII Corps on a campaign to turn the Confederate left flank by crossing the Rappahannock and Rapidan Rivers above Fredericksburg. Passing the Rapidan via Germanna and Ely's Fords, the Federals concentrated near Chancellorsville on April 30 and May 1.

Chancellorsville

Morale in the Federal Army of the Potomac rose with the appointment of Joseph Hooker to command. Hooker reorganized the army and formed a cavalry corps. He wanted to strike at Lee's army while a sizable portion was detached under Longstreet in the Suffolk area. The Federal commander left a substantial force at Fredericksburg to tie Lee to the hills where Burnside had been defeated. Another Union force disappeared westward, crossed the Rapidan and Rappahannock rivers, and converged on Fredericksburg from the west. The Federal cavalry would open the campaign with a raid on Lee's line of communications with the Confederate capital at Richmond. Convinced that Lee would have to retreat, Hooker trusted that his troops could defeat the Confederates as they tried to escape his trap.

The Chancellorsville Campaign

Lincoln appointed "Fighting Joe" Hooker to the command of the Army of the Potomac on January 25, 1863. Hooker immediately set out to improve the welfare and morale of the troops. He introduced corps insignia badges to give the men more pride in their units. He also reorganized the Federal cavalry into a single corps of 11,500 troopers under the command of Brigadier General George Stoneman to better counter the Southern cavalry superiority.

The Chancellorsville Campaign

DURING the winter of 1862-63 and early spring of 1863, Stuart, by frequent raids across the Rappahannock, kept the Federal cavalry busy, protecting Burnside's fight and rear, while in the Valley and in the Appalachian region, Imboden and Jones broke the Federal communications with the west by the Baltimore & Ohio railroad.

The Battle of Chancellorsville

The Battle of Chancellorsville began with the Army of the Potomac, under Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker, facing the Army of Northern Virginia, under Gen. Robert E. Lee.The two armies were still around the same areas that they possessed after the Battle of Fredericksburg on December 1862.

Chancellorsville

In April, 1863, General Joseph Hooker, the commander of the Army of the Potomac, decided to attack the Army of Northern Virginia that had been entrenched on the south side of the Rappahonnock River since the battle of Fredericksburg. Hooker and his 130,000 strong army crossed the river and took up position at Chancellorsville.

Chancellorsville: Lee's Finest Battle

Events in the western theater in the spring and early summer of 1863 were impressive. Those in the east during the same period were fewer in number but equally dramatic. After the battle of Fredericksburg, Burnside's Army of the Potomac went into winter quarters on the north bank of the Rappahannock, while the main body of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia held Fredericksburg and guarded the railway line to Richmond.

Chancellorsville: Virginia Civil War

Passing the Rapidan via Germanna and Ely's Fords, the Federals concentrated near Chancellorsville on April 30 and May 1. The III Corps was ordered to join the army via United States Ford. Sedgwick's VI Corps and Gibbon's division remained to demonstrate against the Confederates at Fredericksburg.

American Civil War: Battle of Chancellorsville

In the wake of the Union disaster at the Battle of Fredericksburg, Major General Ambrose Burnsidewas relieved and Major General Joseph Hooker given command of the Army of the Potomac. With the army encamped on the east bank of the Rappahannock River near Fredericksburg, Hooker took the spring to reorganize and rehabilitate his men after the trials of 1862. To the west of the town, General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia remained in place along the heights they had defended the previous December.

American Civil War: Lee Triumphs at Chancellorsville

May 1-6, 1863 - Confederate forces win a stunning victory at the Battle of Chancellorsville. Taking command of the Army of the Potomac in early 1863, Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker devised a strong plan for renewing hostilities late that spring. Intending to march northwest then south to get in the rear of Gen. Robert E. Lee's army at Fredericksburg, VA, Hooker sought to catch him between two pincers as a second Union force would attack the Confederate front.

Battle of Chancellorsville

Chancellorsville, BATTLE OF. in April, 1863,Hooker, in command of the Army of the Potomac, became impatient, and resolved to put it in motion towards Richmond, notwithstanding his ranks were not full. Cavalry under Stoneman were sent to destroy railways in Lee's rear, but were foiled by the high water in the streams.

Battle of Chancellorsville

The Battle of Chancellorsville occurred between April 26, 1863 through May 6, 1863. It is considered by many to be Robert E. Lee's greatest victory in the United States Civil War. As the Confederate commander-in-chief of the Army of Northern Virginia, Lee gained a victory at Chancellorsville through aggressive strategy using a smaller army then the opposing Union forces. He also had the assistance of valuable generals such as Jubal Early and "Stonewall" Jackson.

Battle of Chancellorsville: Day One

Early in the evening on April 29, 1863, Major General James Ewell Brown Stuart rode up to the Chancellor farmhouse, a well-known inn 11 miles west of Fredericksburg, Virginia, to confer with fellow Major General Richard H. Anderson and Brigadier General Carnot Posey, who commanded a brigade in Anderson's division. The trio and their staffs met to discuss the not unexpected news that a large body of Union troops had crossed the Rappahannock River and was threatening to outflank General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia.

Battle of Chancellorsville

The period extending from the last part of December, 1862, to the end of January 1863, saw the spirit of the main Federal army in the East, the Army of the Potomac, at the lowest point that it would be in the entire war. At no point would the army be closer to complete dissolution as an effective fighting force. Beginning in late June, the army had suffered three major defeats and a Pyrrhic victory that had sapped it of its strength. First there was the Seven Days' campaign, of June 26 through July 1, where the army had been within sight of its ultimate goal of the Rebel Capital of Richmond, under command of Major General George B. McClellan only to be swept back into a tiny enclave abutting the James River by the victorious Confederate army lead by the brilliant General, Robert Edward Lee.

Chancellorsville

President Lincoln replaced Ambrose Burnside with General Joseph Hooker, who had become known as “Fighting Joe” as a result of his aggressive actions in the Peninsular Campaign. By the spring of 1863 he had built the Army of the Potomac to 120,000 men.

Battle of Chancellorsville

American Civil War battle widely considered to be Robert E. Lee's finest achievement. After the failure at Fredricksburg, President Lincoln had to find yet another commander for the Army of the Potomac. His next choice was ‘Fighting' Joe Hooker. Hooker was very confident and very aggressive, but most of this turned out to be pure bluff. At first, he looked to be a most promising appointment. He restored the army's confidence and then put together one of the best plans to be attempted by the Union armies in Virginia.

Citation Information

The following information is provided for citations.

  • Article Title Battle of Chancellorsville External Links
  • Coverage April 30–May 6, 1863
  • Author
  • Keywords battle of chancellorsville
  • Website Name American History Central
  • URL
  • Access Date March 29, 2020
  • Publisher R.Squared Communications, LLC
  • Original Published Date
  • Date of Last Update September 12, 2019

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