John M. Schofield portrait

Although Union Major General John Schofield (pictured here) stalled General John Bell Hood’s advance into Tennessee for five days, the Battle of Columbia was a Confederate victory because Hood eventually forced Schofield to retreat. [Wikimedia Commons]

Battle of Columbia Facts

November 24–29, 1864

Key facts about the Battle of Columbia.

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Date

  • November 24–29, 1864

Location

  • Maury County, Tennessee, near the town of Columbia

Campaign

Principal Union Commanders

Principal Confederate Commanders

Union Forces Engaged

  • Army of the Ohio

Confederate Forces Engaged

  • Army of Tennessee

Number of Union Soldiers Engaged

  • Roughly 28,000

Number of Confederate Soldiers Engaged

  • Roughly 35,000

Estimated Union Casualties

  • Unknown (because little actual fighting took place)

Estimated Confederate Casualties

  • Unknown (because little actual fighting took place)

Result

  • Confederate victory

Significance

  • Although Major General John Schofield stalled Hood’s advance into Tennessee for five days, the battle is considered a Confederate victory because Hood eventually forced Schofield to retreat.

Timeline of the Franklin-Nashville Campaign

These are the main battles and events of the Frankin-Nashville Campaign in order.

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Citation Information

The following information is provided for citations.

  • Article Title Battle of Columbia Facts
  • Coverage November 24–29, 1864
  • Author
  • Keywords battle of columbia
  • Website Name American History Central
  • Access Date August 12, 2022
  • Publisher R.Squared Communications, LLC
  • Original Published Date
  • Date of Last Update May 25, 2022
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