Portrait of Lew Wallace.

After the Civil War, Lew Wallace, the Union commander at the Battle of Monocracy, wrote the famous novel, Ben Hur: A Tale of Christ. [Wikimedia Commons]

Battle of Monocacy Facts

July 9, 1864

Key facts about the Battle of Monocacy, also known as the Battle of Monocacy Junction and the Battle of Monocacy River.

Advertisements

Also Known As

  • Battle of Monocacy Junction
  • Battle of Monocacy River

Date

  • July 9, 1864

Location

  • Frederick County, just east of Frederick, Maryland

Campaign

Principal Union Commanders

Principal Confederate Commanders

Union Forces Engaged

  • Makeshift force, most of whom were Hundred Days Men

Confederate Forces Engaged

  • Army of the Valley

Number of Union Soldiers Engaged

  • Roughly 5,800

Number of Confederate Soldiers Engaged

  • Roughly 14,000

Estimated Union Casualties

  • 1,294 (killed, wounded, captured/missing)

Estimated Confederate Casualties

  • 700 – 900 (killed, wounded, captured/missing)

Result

  • Confederate victory

Interesting Facts

  • Although the Battle of Monocracy was a Confederate victory, Major General Lew Wallace’s soldiers bought precious time for Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant to shift troops from Eastern Virginia to check Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early’s advance on Washington, DC.
  • The Battle of Monocracy (July 9, 1864) has been called the “Battle that Saved Washington.”
  • After the Civil War, Lew Wallace, the Union commander at the Battle of Monocracy wrote the famous novel, Ben Hur: A Tale of Christ.

Timeline of the Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864

These are the main battles and events of the Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864 in order.

Advertisements

Citation Information

The following information is provided for citations.

  • Article Title Battle of Monocacy Facts
  • Coverage July 9, 1864
  • Author
  • Keywords monocacy
  • Website Name American History Central
  • Access Date May 27, 2022
  • Publisher R.Squared Communications, LLC
  • Original Published Date
  • Date of Last Update May 6, 2022
Advertisements