Charles Cotesworth Pinckney External Links

February 25, 1756–August 16, 1825

External Links for Charles Pinckney

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Delegates to the Constitutional Convention: Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

The eldest son of a politically prominent planter and a remarkable mother who introduced and promoted indigo culture in South Carolina, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney was born in 1746 at Charleston. Only 7 years later, he accompanied his father, who had been appointed colonial agent for South Carolina, to England. As a result, the youth enjoyed a European education.

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

Pinckney was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the son of Charles Pinckney (and second cousin to Governor Charles Pinckney by his second wife, the celebrated planter, Eliza Lucas). When a child he was sent to England, like his brother Thomas after him, to be educated. Both of them were at Westminster and Oxford and were called to the bar, and for a time they studied in France at the Royal Military College at Caen.

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney was born on Feb. 14, 1745, in Charleston, S.C. He was taken to England in 1753 and educated at Westminster School and Oxford. Destined for a legal career, he attended Middle Temple (1764-1769) and was admitted to practice. Despite his English residence, Pinckney regarded America as home, and he returned full of patriotic ardor. He served as attorney general for three South Carolina districts. His marriage to Sally Middleton strengthened his ties with the colony's leading families.

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, distinguished as a patriot, soldier and diplomatist, was born in South Carolina in 1740. His education was received in England, where he passed through Westminster school and the University of Oxford with a high reputation for ability and industry. After reading law at the Temple, he returned to Carolina in 1769, but was not able to practice his profession for any length of time, the commencement of the Revolution obliging him to exchange the gown for the sword. He was first appointed a captain in the continental line, and, soon afterward, commander of the first regiment of Carolina infantry. When the South had been freed, for a period, from invasion, by Moultrie's gallant defense of the fort on Sullivan's Island, Colonel Pinckney joined the northern army, and was made aid-de-camp toWashington. In that capacity he was present at the battles of Brandywine and Germantown.

Charles (Cotesworth) Pinckney Biography

(born Feb. 25, 1746, Charleston, S.C.—died Aug. 16, 1825, Charleston, S.C., U.S.) U.S. soldier, statesman, and diplomat. A cousin of Charles Pinckney and the brother of Thomas Pinckney, he was an aide to George Washington in the American Revolution, commanded at Savannah, Ga., and was promoted to brigadier general in 1783. He was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention. Appointed minister to France (1796), he was involved in negotiations that ended in the XYZ Affair; when one of the group of French negotiators suggested that the U.S. representatives offer a gift in order to gain a peace treaty, Pinckney is said to have replied, “No! No! Not a sixpence!” He was the unsuccessful Federalist candidate for vice president in 1800 and for president in 1804 and 1808.

PINCKNEY, Charles Cotesworth

(1746–1825), American statesman, born Feb. 25, 1746, in Charleston, S.C., and educated at the University of Oxford. He became prominent as an advocate of American independence and participated in several battles of the American Revolution, rising to the rank of brigadier general in the Contine ntal army. In 1787 he was a delegate to the Federal Constitutional Convention, and in 1788 he was influential in securing ratification of the U.S. Constitution in South Carolina. He was appointed minister to France in 1796. The French government refused to receive him officially, and he left. He returned the following year with the American statesmen Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts and John Marshall of Virginia. They were approached by three French emissaries, who offered to begin negotiations for settling the main differences between France and the U.S. in return for a loan to their government. Interpreting this as a demand for a bribe, the Americans refused. In their report to Congress, comprising the correspondence that had passed between them and the French envoys, the three American commissioners substituted the letters “X,” “Y,” and “Z” for the names of the Frenchmen. The incident later became famous as the XYZ AFFAIR, (q.v.). Pinckney was an unsuccessful Federalist candidate for vice-president in 1800 and for president in 1804 and 1808.

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney [pink' nE] was born in Charleston, South Carolina, on February 25, 1746, the son of Charles Pinckney, a prominent figure in colonial times. He was educated at Westminster and Oxford in England and at the Royal Military College at Caen, France. Returning to America in 1769, he took up the practice of law at Charleston.

Delegates to the Constitutional Convention: Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

The eldest son of a politically prominent planter and a remarkable mother who introduced and promoted indigo culture in South Carolina, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney was born in 1746 at Charleston. Only 7 years later, he accompanied his father, who had been appointed colonial agent for South Carolina, to England. As a result, the youth enjoyed a European education.

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (1745-1825), American statesman, was a patriot leader and an emissary to France. He was twice the Federalist nominee for president.

South Carolina Delegates to the Constitutional Convention: Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

The eldest son and heir of a prominent planter, lawyer, and political figure and a remarkable mother, the agriculturalist Eliza Lucas Pinckney, Pinckney had every advantage educationally and financially. He was schooled in England and went to Christ Church College, Oxford. For his legal training, he attended London's famous Middle Temple.

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

PINCKNEY, Charles Cotesworth, statesman, born in Charleston, South Carolina, 25 February, 1746; died there, 16 August, 1825. His father, Charles, was chief justice of South Carolina in 1752. The son was sent to England to be educated at seven years of age, studied at Westminster school, and was graduated at Christ church, Oxford, read law in the Middle Temple, and passed nine months in the Royal military academy at Caen, France. He returned to this country in 1769, settled as a barrister in Charleston, and became attorney-general of the province. He was a Provincial congress of South Carolina in 1775, was appointed by that body a captain of infantry, and in December of that year was promoted major, lie assisted to successfully defend Fort Sullivan on 28 June, 1776, became colonel on 29 October, and left the Carolinas to join Washington, to whom he was appointed aide-de-camp, participating in the battles of the Brandywine and Germantown.

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, American politician was born in Charleston, South Carolina, on the 25th of February 1746, the son of Charles Pinckney (d. 1758), by his second wife, the celebrated girl planter, Eliza Lucas. When a child he was sent to England, like his brother Thomas after him, to be educated. Both of them were at Westminster and Oxford and were called to the bar, and for a time they studied in France at the Royal Military College at Caen. Returning to America in 1769, C. C. Pinckney began the practice of law at Charleston, and soon became deputy attorney-general of the province.

Citation Information

The following information is provided for citations.

  • Article Title Charles Pinckney External Links
  • Coverage February 25, 1756–August 16, 1825
  • Author
  • Keywords charles cotesworth pinckney
  • Website Name American History Central
  • URL
  • Access Date March 29, 2020
  • Publisher R.Squared Communications, LLC
  • Original Published Date
  • Date of Last Update August 27, 2019

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