Peyton Randolph, Illustration

Peyton Randolph was the first President of the First Continental Congress. Image Source: New York Public Library Digital Collections.

First Continental Congress Facts

September 5, 1774–October 26, 1774 — American Revolution

Facts about the First Continental Congress, including dates, participants, accomplishments, and more interesting details you might not know. This fact sheet provides a quick overview of the debates and the proceedings and is for kids doing research and students preparing for the AP U.S. History (APUSH) exam.

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Quick Facts

  • Date Started: The First Continental Congress convened on September 5, 1774.
  • Date Ended: The First Continental Congress adjourned on October 26, 1774.
  • Location: The meetings were held in Carpenter’s Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  • First President: Peyton Randolph of Virginia was unanimously elected to preside over the meetings.
  • Number of Delegates in Attendance: There were 56 delegates that participated in the meetings.
  • Number of Colonies in Attendance: The 56 delegates came from 12 of the 13 colonies.

First Continental Congress, Opening Prayer

This illustration depicts Reverend Jacob Duché delivering the opening prayer to the First Continental Congress. Image Source: New York Public Library Digital Collections.

Interesting Facts About the First Continental Congress

  • 12 of the 13 colonies sent delegates. Georgia was the only colony that did not send delegates.
  • Congress originally leaned toward endorsing a plan presented by Joseph Galloway of Pennsylvania.
  • His plan, known as Galloway’s Plan of Union, proposed the creation of an American parliament to work with the British Parliament in governing the colonies.
  • Before the Galloway Plan was endorsed, the delegation from Massachusetts presented the Suffolk Resolves.
  • The Suffolk Resolves were drafted by Dr. Joseph Warren at a meeting in Suffolk County, Massachusetts, and were more radical than the Galloway Plan.
  • The Resolves proposed, among other things, establishing a free state of Massachusetts until Parliament repealed the Coercive Acts, boycotting trade with Great Britain, and arming the local militia in Massachusetts.
  • Congress endorsed the Suffolk Resolves and ordered them to be printed in the newspapers throughout the colonies.
  • Congress established a pact called the Continental Association and called for a total cessation of trade with Great Britain to become effective on December 1, 1774, unless Parliament rescinded the Coercive Acts.
  • Congress drafted the Declaration of Rights and Grievances, also known as the Declaration and Resolves of the First Continental Congress, on October 14, 1774.
  • Congress addressed and sent this document to King George instead of Parliament to demonstrate colonial loyalty to the Crown.

Fun Facts About the First Continental Congress

  • The first issue the delegates had to decide on was if the room at Carpenter’s Hall suited their needs.
  • Thomas Jefferson was not a member of the First Continental Congress.

Accomplishments of the First Continental Congress

The delegates to the First Continental Congress joined together to debate several key concepts regarding their opposition to the Coercive Acts. By the time the debates were finished, Congress had:

  1. Adopted the Suffolk Resolves and ordered them to be sent to newspapers throughout the colonies to be printed and distributed.
  2. Created the Continental Association and the Articles of Association in order to enforce a trade boycott against Britain.
  3. Approved the Declaration and Resolves of the First Continental Congress, which were sent to King George III.
  4. Agreed to reconvene in the spring of 1775 if the Coercive Acts were not repealed by Britain.

British Response to the First Continental Congress

The British response to the actions of the First Continental Congress made war nearly inevitable. On March 30, 1775, Parliament passed, and the King approved, the New England Restraining Act, which:

  1. Prohibited the New England colonies from trading with any country other than Britain.
  2. Banned New England fishermen from fishing in the North Atlantic, off Newfoundland and Nova Scotia.

Election of Delegates to the First Continental Congress

Connecticut Delegates

Connecticut was the first colony to select its delegates, which it did on June 3, 1774. The delegates were elected by the Connecticut House of Representatives.

Rhode Island Delegates

Rhode Island elected its delegates on June 15, 1774. The delegates were elected by the General Assembly of Rhode Island. They were approved by Joseph Wanton, the Governor of Rhode Island, on August 10.

Massachusetts Delegates

Massachusettes elected its delegates on June 17, 1774. They were elected by the House of Representatives at a meeting that was held in Salem.

Samuel Adams, Painting, Copley

Samuel Adams played an important role in Boston and opposed the Coercive Acts. He was one of the key delegates from Massachusetts to the First Continental Congress. Image Source: Wikipedia.

Maryland Delegates

Maryland elected its delegates on June 22. They were elected at a meeting that was held in Annapolis by committees that had been appointed by the counties in the colony.

  • Samuel Chase
  • Robert Goldsborough
  • Thomas Johnson
  • William Paca
  • Matthew Tilghman

South Carolina Delegates

South Carolina elected its delegates on July 1. They were selected at a “general meeting of the inhabitants.” They were approved by the South Carolina Assembly on August 2.

New Hampshire Delegates

New Hampshire elected its delegates on July 21, 1774. They were elected by “deputies appointed by the several towns.” The meeting was held in Exeter.

Pennsylvania Delegates

Pennsylvania elected its delegates on July 22. They were elected by a “Committee of the whole house.”

John Dickinson, Illustration

John Dickinson was a delegate from Pennsylvania to the First Continental Congress. Dickinson opposed British policies but did not favor independence. Image Source: New York Public Library Digital Collections.

New Jersey Delegates

New Jersey elected its delegates on July 23. They were selected by committees that had been appointed by “several Counties of the Colony of New Jersey” at a meeting that was held in New Brunswick.

  • Stephen Crane
  • John De Hart
  • James Kinsey
  • William Livingston
  • Richard Smith

Virginia Delegates

Virginia elected its delegates on August 1. The delegates were selected at the Virginia Convention, which was held in Williamsburg.

Delaware Delegates

The “Three Counties Newcastle, Ken, & Sussex on Delaware” — or Delaware — elected its delegates on August 2. They were chosen by “Representatives of the freemen” at a meeting that was held in Newcastle.

New York Delegates

New York’s delegates were elected around August 20, 1774. The election process in New York also allowed each county to select its own representative.

North Carolina Delegates

North Carolina elected its delegates on August 25 at a meeting that was held by the “deputies of the Inhabitants” of the colony at New Bern, North Carolina.

  • Richard Caswell
  • Joseph Hewes
  • William Hooper

Presidents of The First Continental Congress

There were two men who oversaw the proceedings of the First Continental Congress.

  1. Peyton Randolph of Virginia presided over the meetings from September 5, 1774, to October 22, 1774.
  2. Henry Middleton of South Carolina presided over the meetings from October 22, 1774, to October 26, 1774.
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Citation Information

The following information is provided for citations.

  • Article Title First Continental Congress Facts
  • Coverage September 5, 1774–October 26, 1774
  • Author
  • Keywords First Continental Congress, American Revolution
  • Website Name American History Central
  • Access Date July 7, 2022
  • Publisher R.Squared Communications, LLC
  • Original Published Date
  • Date of Last Update June 29, 2022
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