Portrait of King George III by Allan Ramsay.
Portrait of King George III by Allan Ramsay.

French and Indian War External Links

1754–1763

External Links for French and Indian War

Disclaimer: If you click on any of the links below, you will leave American History Central. We do not not certify the accuracy of information, nor endorse points of view expressed on the site to which you are navigating.

Background of the French and Indian War

The early colonial wars between France and Britain were fought primarily in Europe; American events played relatively minor roles. After three rounds, no clear victor had emerged.

French and Indian War Chronology

A chronology of events during the French and Indian War.

French and Indian War

Rivalry for the West, particularly for the valley of the upper Ohio, prepared the way for another war. In 1748 a group of Virginians interested in Western lands formed the Ohio Company, and at the same time the French were investigating possibilities of occupying the upper Ohio region. The French were first to act, moving S from Canada and founding two forts. Robert Dinwiddie, governor of Virginia, sent an emissary, young George Washington, to protest.

The French and Indian War

Round four of the global struggle between England and France began in 1754. Unlike the three previous conflicts, this war began in America. French and British soldiers butted heads with each other over control of the Ohio Valley. At stake were the lucrative fur trade and access to the all-important Mississippi River, the lifeline of the FRONTIER to the west.

French and Indian Wars

French and Indian Wars, name applied to the conflicts over Canada and the West involved in the territorial rivalry of France and Great Britain, and related to their larger imperial struggles abroad.

French and Indian War

The French and Indian War (1754–1763) was the North American chapter of the Seven Years' War, known in Canada as the War of the Conquest. The name refers to the two main enemies of the British: the royal French forces and the various American Indian forces allied with them. The conflict, the fourth such colonial war between the kingdoms of France and Great Britain, resulted in the British conquest of Canada. The outcome was one of the most significant developments in acentury of Anglo-French conflict.

French and Indian War

The French and Indian War, was the North American phase of the Seven Years War in Europe. It was a war fought between Britain and France from 1755 to 1760 in territory that became Canada and the United States. Native Americans fought for both sides, although mainly on the side of the French. The British were victorious, ending France's control of Canada and the Mississippi Valley. Spain was granted Louisiana as compensation for the loss of Florida. The war was officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1763.

The French and Indian War

France and Britain engaged in a succession of wars in Europe and the Caribbean at several intervals in the 18th century. Though Britain secured certain advantages from them -- primarily in the sugar-rich islands of the Caribbean -- the struggles were generally indecisive, and France remained in a powerful position in North America at the beginning of the Seven Years War in 1754.

The French and Indian War

In the continuing colonial rivalry, attention soon focused on the Forks of the Ohio River, a strategically crucial area claimed by both the British and the French but effectively occupied by neither. In 1754 the Ohio Company of Virginia, a group of land speculators, began building a fort at the Forks only to have the workers ejected by a strong French expedition, which then proceeded to construct Fort Duquesne on the site. Virginia militia commanded by young George Washington proved no match for the French and Indians from Fort Duquesne. Defeated at Fort Necessity (July 1754), they were forced to withdraw east of the mountains.

French and Indian War

(1754–63), last of four North American wars waged from 1689 to 1763 between the British and the French, with their respective Indian and colonial allies, for domination in the New World. Britain's eventual victory stripped France of its North American empire, thus concluding the series of conflicts (see KING GEORGE'S WAR; KING WILLIAM'S WAR; QUEEN ANNE'S WAR), which were known collectively as the French and Indian Wars. Although the war began in America, it expanded (1756–63) into Europe as the SEVEN YEARS' WAR, (q.v.), and into Asia as the Third Carnatic War (see CARNATIC WARS,).

The French and Indian War

France and Britain engaged in a succession of wars in Europe and the Caribbean at several intervals in the 18th century. Though Britain secured certain advantages from them -- primarily in the sugar-rich islands of the Caribbean -- the struggles were generally indecisive, and France remained in a powerful position in North America at the beginning of the Seven Years War in 1754.

A Brief History of The French & Indian War

In the early part of the eighteenth century, the trans-Appalachian region of North America remained much as it had been for the preceding centuries. Some trappers and backwoodsmen—Frenchmen from Canada and Englishmen from the British colonies—traveled through its woods and rivers, but th e principal occupants of the region were Native Americans and a great diversity of wildlife. As the British colonies became more populated and prosperous, their citizens began to look towards the rich lands across the Appalachian mountains as providing new opportunities for settlement and economic growth. The French, who claimed the entire watersheds of the Mississippi and St. Lawrence Rivers—which included the Great Lakes and the Ohio River valley—became worried about British encroachments into this region and so they moved to set up a series of forts, including at Crown Point on Lake Champlain, and on the Wabash, Ohio, Mississippi and Missouri Rivers. The British, meanwhile, built their own forts at Oswego and Halifax, the government granted lands in the Ohio Valley to the Ohio Company and adventurous traders set up bases in the region.

French and Indian War

The French and Indian War (1754 -1763) was one in a series of wars fought between England and France beginning in the late 1600s. What made the French and Indian War different from the earlier conflicts was that it began in the New World. All previous wars had begun in Europe, and with the exception of King George's War (1744 – 1748), no battles had been fought in the New World. Most of these conflicts began because each side hoped to gain trade or military advantages in Europe as well as in various European colonies in Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

The Seven Years War Website

Articles, links, sound and video clips about the French and Indian War.

Newspaper Coverage of the English and French War For Control of North America, 1754-1760

The news in America's newspapers in the first six months of 1754 was not good. England's long-time enemy and challenger for control of North America, France, had, with the assistance of Native American allies, scored a series of victories over English colonial troops from the back country of Virginia through New England. Fear that France would soon make a move to drive all the English out of North America seemed ready to become reality.

The War That Made America

A PBS documentary, tells the story of the French and Indian War and how it impacted the American Revolution.

French and Indian War Resource Guide

The French and Indian War was waged from 1754 to 1763 and fighting occurred in the northeastern portion of the pre-revolution British colonies and in Canada. The participants in the conflict included Great Britain, France, Spain, the British colonies and several Indian tribes. Even though it is called the French and Indian War, it is also called the North American portion of the Seven Years War, which was conducted in Europe from 1756 to 1763.

The French and Indian War

THE Treaty of Aiz-la-Chapelle of 1748, like its predecessors, at Ryswick and Utrecht failed to settle the vital question between the rival claimants of North America. A commission of two Englishmen and two Frenchmen sat in Paris for many months after this treaty was signed, endeavoring to adjust the French-English boundaries in America; but they labored in vain.

Citation Information

The following information is provided for citations.

  • Article Title French and Indian War External Links
  • Coverage 1754–1763
  • Author
  • Keywords french and indian war
  • Website Name American History Central
  • URL
  • Access Date March 29, 2020
  • Publisher R.Squared Communications, LLC
  • Original Published Date
  • Date of Last Update January 13, 2018

Study Guides for the 2020 AP Exam

Get the study guides for history and U.S. politics from Amazon.com and get ready for your 2020 AP exams!

GET THE BEST OF AMERICAN HISTORY CENTRAL DELIVERED TO YOUR INBOX!
SIGN UP
By signing up for this email, you are agreeing to receive news, offers, updates, and additional information from R.Squared Communications, LLC and American History Central. Easy unsubscribe links are included in every email.
CLOSE [X]