Dead Confederate soldiers on the Antietam battlefield

The culmination of the Maryland Campaign was the Battle of Antietam, fought on September 17, 1864. This image, captured by Alexander Gardner, features some of the roughly 1,500 Confederate soldiers who died on the bloodiest single day of the Civil War. [Wikimedia Commons]

Maryland Campaign Facts

September 4–September 20, 1862

Key facts about the American Civil War Maryland Campaign.

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Also Known As

  • Antietam Campaign

Date and Location

  • September 4–20, 1862
  • Maryland and West Virginia

Timeline of the Maryland Campaign

These are the main battles and events of the Maryland Campaign in order.

Principal Union Commanders

Principal Confederate Commanders

Union Forces Engaged

  • Army of the Potomac

Confederate Forces Engaged

  • Army of Northern Virginia

Number of Union Soldiers Engaged

  • Roughly 102,234

Number of Confederate Soldiers Engaged

  • Roughly 55,000

Estimated Union Casualties

  • 27,940 (2,673 killed; 11,756 wounded; 13,511 captured/missing)

Estimated Confederate Casualties

  • 10–20,000 (killed, wounded, captured/missing)

Result

  • Union victory

Significance

  • After the campaign was over, President Abraham Lincoln dismissed McClellan as commander of the Army of the Potomac on November 5, 1862.
  • Lincoln also employed his constitutional power as commander-in-chief to issue his Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation on September 22, 1862.
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Citation Information

The following information is provided for citations.

  • Article Title Maryland Campaign Facts
  • Coverage September 4–September 20, 1862
  • Author
  • Website Name American History Central
  • Access Date July 27, 2021
  • Publisher R.Squared Communications, LLC
  • Original Published Date
  • Date of Last Update February 24, 2021
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