Victims of the Salem Witch Trials

1692

The victims of the Salem Witch Trials are the 20 men and women who were unlawfully executed as a result of the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria of 1692.

Salem Witch Trials, the Salem Martyr, Noble

“The Salem Martyr” by Thomas Satterwhite Noble (1869). Image Source: Wikipedia.

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Events of the Salem Witch Trials and Its Victims

“The proceedings in witchcraft in 1692 to us who are two hundred and twenty years removed from the scene, seem, at first, impossible, then mortifying, and persuasive of disowning our fathers and forgetting the period of their folly. At best, the occurrence furnishes the wildest and saddest chapter in our New England history.” 

— from “A Short Story of the Salem Witchcraft Trials” by M. V. B. Perley, 1911.

Salem Witch Trials, George Jacobs Sr, Matteson
This painting depicts the witchcraft trial of victim George Jacobs, Sr. Image Source: Wikipedia.

The Salem Witchcraft Hysteria

In 1692, the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria took place in and around the town of Salem, Massachusetts. During January and February, a group of young girls in Salem Village, a small town about five miles outside of Salem Town, started to experience pain, sickness, and other symptoms. When the local doctor was unable to diagnose them, he suggested it was the work of witches. From that point on, the girls started to blame their symptoms on the “specters” of people living in Salem Village and surrounding towns. 

As the hysteria grew, so did the accusations. The girls started to concoct stories of witches holding meetings and conspiring with the Devil in a plot to take control of all of New England. Despite the outrageous claims they seemed to make, the girls were not the only ones to witness strange occurrences. Many people, including men and women, started to report seeing strange animals and what can only be described as paranormal activity. 

Fear and Insecurity on the Frontier

All of this took place at a time when the villages, towns, and cities throughout Massachusetts and New England were usually on alert. People lived in constant fear of attacks by the French and Native American Indians, which could come at any time. Further, most settlements were less than 50 miles inland from the coast and were in close proximity to deep forests where they believed dark spirits lived. The people of Salem Town — around 500-600 total — in 1692 were Puritans. They were deeply religious and believed as much in the grace and goodness of God as they did in the evil and trickery of the Devil.

Political Transition for Massachusetts

The hysteria also came at a time when the Massachusetts Colony was in a political transition. The original 1629 Charter was revoked in 1684 and Massachusetts was made part of the Dominion of New England. The Dominion collapsed in 1689 and Massachusetts went back to operating under its old charter, with a provisional government. Later that year, King William’s War started, which raised tension throughout all of New England. In 1691, King William and Queen Mary granted Massachusetts a new charter and appointed William Phips as the new Governor.

The Court of Oyer and Terminer

Phips arrived on May 14 and was informed of the situation in Salem. On May 27, he organized a special court — the Cout of Oyer and Terminer — to hear the trials of the men and women who were accused of witchcraft. Despite the objections of ministers, such as Cotton Mather, the court allowed “spectral evidence” to be admitted as testimony. Spectral Evidence consisted of things only the accusers could see or that appeared to them in a dream.

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The Salem Witchcraft Trials Start

From June to September 1692, 20 people were arrested, indicted on accusations of witchcraft, and lost their lives. All of them spent time in jail, while they waited for the Massachusetts government to set up courts to hear their cases. Once the Court of Oyer and Terminer was established, each of them went before a grand jury, which heard testimony in their cases. Unfortunately, the afflicted girls were allowed to sit in on the trials. In almost every hearing, they broke out in screaming fits and made further accusations against people. The accused had almost no recourse. They were not allowed to have their own lawyer and essentially defended themselves. When they were unable to explain the visions and pain the girls appeared to be experiencing, the Grand Jury believed the girls and found the accused guilty.

Examination of a Witch, Salem Witch Trials, Matteson
Examination of a Witch (1853) by T. H. Matteson. Image Source: Wikipedia.

17th Century Witchcraft Laws

Under the Witchcraft Law of 1604 and the 1641 Massachusetts Body of Liberties, the crime of witchcraft was punishable by death. All 19 were sentenced to death by the judges of the Court of Oyer and Terminer.

During the course of the hearings and trials, there were many people who thought the girls were lying. Some people — including John Proctor — spoke up and accused the girls — only to have the girls accuse him of tormenting them with his specter.

The End of the Salem Witchcraft Trials

In October 1692, Increase Mather, one of the most prominent ministers in Boston, denounced the use of spectral evidence in witchcraft trials. Soon after, Governor Phips dissolved the Court of Oyer and Terminer. Starting in January 1693, the remaining witchcraft trials were taken before the Superior Court of Judicature. From then on, most of the accused were found not guilty. For the few that were found guilty, Governor Phips issued pardons. The last Salem Witch Trial was held in May 1693 and brought an end to the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria.

Clearing the Names of the Victims

However, it is clear that the 19 people who were convicted by the Court of Oyer and Terminer — based on spectral evidence — were nothing more than victims of the hysteria that gripped Salem. As early as 1700, petitions were filed to have the convictions overturned and the trials were declared unlawful in 1702. In 1711, a bill was passed that overturned the convictions. Nearly 250 years later, in 1957, Massachusetts issued a formal apology for the trials.

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Important Dates for the Victims of the Salem Witchcraft Crisis

June 10, 1692 — Bridget Bishop becomes a victim of the Salem Witch Trials when she is hanged on what is Gallow’s Hill in present-day Salem, Massachusetts, near Proctor’s Ledge.

June 19, 1692 — These victims, all women, were hanged on Gallow’s Hill:

  1. Sarah Good
  2. Elizabeth Howe
  3. Susannah Martin
  4. Rebecca Nurse
  5. Sara Wildes

August 19, 1692 — These victims, four men and one woman, were hanged on Gallow’s Hill:

  1. George Burroughs
  2. Martha Carrier 
  3. George Jacobs Sr.
  4. John Proctor
  5. John Willard

September 19, 1692 — Giles Corey is crushed to death by having heavy rocks placed on him. The method is known as “pressing.” The court ordered it because he refused to enter a plea before the court.

September 22, 1692 — These victims, seven women and one man, were hanged on Gallow’s Hill:

  1. Martha Corey
  2. Mary Easty
  3. Alice Parker
  4. Mary Parker
  5. Ann Pudeator
  6. Wilmot Redd
  7. Margaret Scott
  8. Samuel Wardwell
Salem Witch Trials, Proctor's Ledge and Gallow's Hill
Photo by Jangseung92. The city of Danvers, Massachusetts dedicated Proctor’s Ledge Memorial to the victims executed during the Salem Witch Trials. Even though the exact site of the witch hangings was not known for many years, a group of researchers determined that the actual site of the Salem Witch Trial executions was located right on the hill behind Proctor’s Ledge. And thus, the city of Danvers built the Proctor’s Ledge Memorial to honor the victims. Cropped and resized from original. License.

Facts About the Victim of June 10

Bridget Bishop

Bridget Playfer was born in England around 1632. She married Samuel Wasselby in 1660. Soon after, they moved to Massachusetts. Samuel died in 1664 and she married Thomas Oliver in 1666. Bridget and Thomas had a contentious marriage and after he died in 1679 his children accused her of using witchcraft to cause his death. She was cleared of the charges due to a lack of evidence. In 1687, she married Edward Bishop. They lived in Salem Town.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim Bridget Bishop:

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  • April 16 — Bridget Bishop is accused of tormenting the afflicted girls.
  • April 18 — A warrant is issued for her arrest. She is arrested and taken to Ingersoll’s Tavern in Salem Village.
  • April 19 — Bishop is examined by the Salem Magistrates — Jonathan Hathorne and Jonathan Corwin. She is sent to jail to await trial. At some point, she is sent to prison in Boston.
  • June 1 — Bishop and others are transferred to the Salem jail.
  • June 2 — The Court of Oyer and Terminer hears its first Salem Witchcraft Trial — the case against Bridget Bishop. After lengthy testimony from the afflicted and other witnesses, she is found guilty by the jury.
  • June 8 — William Stoughton signs a death warrant, ordering her execution.
  • June 10 — Bridget Bishop is hanged.

Facts About the Victims of July 19, 1692

Sarah Good

Sarah Good was married to William Good. He was a laborer and they were a poor family. Sarah was well known in Salem for wandering the streets and asking for handouts. The two of them had a history of becoming involved in arguments with others in Salem and had a poor reputation.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim Sarah Good:

  • February 27 — Ann Putnam Jr. accuses Sarah Good of afflicting her.
  • February 28 — Elizabeth Hubbard accuses Good of tormenting her.
  • February 29 — A warrant is issued for Good’s arrest.
  • March 1 — She is arrested and taken to Ingersoll’s Tavern in Salem Village where she is questioned by Magistrates John Hathorne and Jonathan Corwin. She is held at the home of Constable Joseph Herrick. She tries to escape from him three times, but she is caught each time.
  • March 2 — Good is placed in jail in Ipswitch.
  • June 1 — Sarah Good is transferred to the Salem jail to await trial.
  • June 28 — Her case is heard before the Court of Oyer and Terminer. The jury finds her guilty.
  • July 12 — William Stoughton signs a death warrant, ordering her execution.
  • July 19 — Sarah Good is hanged.
Salem Witch Trials, Arrest of a Witch, Pyle
This illustration by Howard Pyle depicts the arrest of a witch. Image Source: New York Public Library Digitial Collections.

Elizabeth Howe

Elizabeth Jackson was born in Rowley England in 1635. She emigrated with her family to Massachusetts sometime between her birth and 1650. In 1658, she married James Howe Jr. They lived on a farm in Topsfield, near Ipswich, roughly 6 miles north of Salem Village. In 1682, they had a disagreement with the family of Samuel and Ruth Perley. Soon after, the Perley’s daughter started acting strangely and Elizabeth was accused of tormenting the child through the use of witchcraft. Howe was never arrested on charges of witchcraft, but her reputation in the community was damaged.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim Elizabeth Howe:

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  • May 28 — A complaint is filed against her by John Holten and Jonathan Wolcott and a warrant is issued for her arrest.
  • May 30 — She is at the home of her brother-in-law, Captain John How when she is served the warrant by Constable Ephraim Wildes and arrested.
  • May 31 — Howe is questioned by Magistrates Hathorne and Corwin and is held for trial.
  • June 30 — Her case is heard before the Court of Oyer and Terminer and the jury finds her guilty.
  • July 12 — William Stoughton signs a death warrant, ordering her execution.
  • July 19 — Elizabeth Howe is hanged.

Susannah Martin

Susannah North was born in Buckinghamshire, England in 1621. She emigrated to Massachusetts with her family in 1639 and they settled in Salisbury. In 1646, she married George Martin and in 1654 they moved to Amesbury. Sussanah was accused of witchcraft twice, but both times the charges against her were dropped. George died in 1686 and she was left poor and destitute.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim Susannah Martin:

  • April 30 — A complaint is filed against Susannah Martin and a warrant is issued for her arrest.
  • May 2 — Martin is arrested, questioned, and sent to jail.
  • June 1 — She is transferred to the Salem jail to await trial.
  • June 28 — Martin’s case is heard before the Court of Oyer and Terminer. The jury finds her guilty.
  • July 12 — William Stoughton signs a death warrant, ordering her execution.
  • July 19 — Susannah Martin is hanged.

Rebecca Nurse

Rebecca Towne was born in Yarmouth, England in 1621. She was the older sister of Mary Eastey and Sarah Cloyce, who were also accused during the Witchcraft Hysteria. The family emigrated to Massachusetts and settled near Salem Village. In 1670, their mother was accused of witchcraft, but no charges were filed. Rebecca married Francis Nurse in 1640. They lived in Salem Village. By the time of the Salem Witchcraft Crisis, Rebecca was in her early 70s, frail, and hard of hearing.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim Rebecca Nurse:

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  • March 13–18 — Ann Putnam Jr. and Abigail Williams accuse Rebecca Nurse.
  • March 22 — A committee visits Nurse at her home to let her know she has been accused.
  • March 23 — Ann Putnam Jr. accuses her again and a formal complaint is filed.
  • March 24 — Nurse is arrested, questioned by the Magistrates at Ingersoll’s Tavern, and sent to jail.
  • June 1 — She is transferred to the Salem jail to await trial.
  • June 29 — The Court of Oyer and Terminer hears the case of Rebecca Nurse. She is initially found innocent, but the jury changes its verdict and finds her guilty.
  • July 3 — Nurse is excommunicated from the Salem Town Church.
  • July 4 — Her family meets with Governor William Phips. He grants her a reprieve but rescinds it after the afflicted girls accuse her of tormenting them again.
  • July 12 — William Stoughton signs a death warrant, ordering her execution.
  • July 19 — Rebecca Nurse is hanged.

Sarah Wildes

Sarah Averill was born around 1627 in Chipping Norton, England. Her family emigrated to Massachusetts around 1637 and settled in Ipswich. Sarah had several run-ins with the law before she married her John Wildes of Topsfield in 1663.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim Sarah Wildes:

  • April 21 — A warrant is issued for her arrest after she is accused by Ann Putnam Jr., Mercy Lewis, and Mary Walcott.
  • June 18 — She is transferred from the Boston jail to the Salem jail
  • June 30 — The Court of Oyer and Terminer hear her case and the jury finds her guilty.
  • July 12 — William Stoughton signs a death warrant, ordering her execution.
  • July 19 — Sarah Wildes is hanged.

Facts About the Victims of August 19, 1692

George Burroughs

George Burroughs was born in Suffolk, England in 1652. He emigrated to the colonies with his family and eventually settled in Roxbury, Massachusetts. He attended Harvard College and graduated in 1670. In 1674, he moved to Falmouth, Maine, where he served as the minister of the Falmouth Congregational Church. He served there until the church town was destroyed during King Philip’s War in 1676. After fleeing to Casco Bay, he settled in Salisbury, Massachusetts. In 1680, he was offered the position of minister for the Salem Village Church. He accepted but ran into several issues with the people of Salem Village. In 1690, he moved to Wells, Maine.

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Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim George Burroughs:

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  • April 21 — Abigail Williams accuses Geroge Burroughs of afflicting her.
  • April 23 — Deliverance Hobbs identifies George Burroughs as a man that she has seen with the witches in Salem.
  • April 30 — Jonathan Walcott and Thomas Putnam file a complaint against Burroughs, who is living in Maine.
  • May 2 — George Burroughs is arrested in Wells, Maine.
  • May 4 — Burroughs arrives in Salem Town and is held in a tavern owned by Thomas Beadle.
  • May 5 — Burroughs appears before the court, testifies, and is sent to jail to await trial.
  • June 18 — George Burroughs is transferred from the Boston jail to the Salem jail.
  • July 21 — Martha Lacy Jr. implicates Burroughs as the leader of the witches in Salem.
  • August 5 — Burroughs appears before the Court of Oyer and Terminer. He is found guilty by the jury.
  • August 19 — George Burroughs is hanged.
Salem Witch Trials, George Burroughs on the Gallows
George Burroughs on the gallows. Image Source: New York Public Library Digital Collections.

Martha Carrier

Mary Allen was born in the late 1640s in Andover, Massachusetts. In 1674, she married Thomas Carrier, an indentured servant and they lived in Billerica, Massachusetts. The family had a poor reputation and eventually moved to Andover. After they moved to Andover, there was an outbreak of smallpox. The town apparently blamed the Carriers for bringing the disease, even though Mary and other family members suffered from the disease.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim Martha Carrier:

  • April 22 — The first accusations are made against Martha Carrier.
  • May 15 — Phebe Chandler of Andover accuses Martha Carrier of attacking her.
  • May 28 — John Holten and Jonathan Wolcott file an official complaint against Carrier.
  • May 31 — Carrier is arrested, questioned by the Magistrates, and taken to jail to await trial.
  • July 21 — Martha Lacy Jr. implicates Carrier as a leader of the witches in Salem, along with George Burroughs.
  • July 22 — Two of her sons, Richard and Andrew, confess to being witches and implicate their mother.
  • August 2 — The witchcraft trial of Martha Carrier is heard by the Court of Oyer and Terminer. The jury finds her guilty of the charges.
  • August 19 — Martha Carrier is hanged.

George Jacobs Sr.

George Jacobs Sr. was born in England, however, his date of birth is unclear. At some point, he emigrated to Massachusetts and bought a house in Salem Village in 1658. He married and had three children — George Jacobs Jr, Ann Jacobs, and Mary Jacobs. Jacobs Sr. had a reputation for having a temper.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim George Jacobs Sr.:

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  • May 10 — A warrant is issued for the arrest of George Jacobs Sr. He is arrested, taken to Salem Town, and questioned. He is held for further questioning.
  • May 11 — Jacobs undergoes further questioning at Beadle’s Tavern in Salem Town. He is sent to jail to be held for trial.
  • May 11 — His granddaughter, Margaret Jacobs, confesses to being a witch and implicates him and George Burroughs.
  • May 12 — Jacobs Sr. and others are transferred to the Boston jail.
  • May 13 — Margaret Jacobs recants her confession and the accusations she made against her grandfather and Burroughs. The magistrates are not convinced and have her confined to a room by herself.
  • June 18 — George Jacobs Sr. is transferred from the Boston jail to the Salem jail.
  • August 2 — The witchcraft trial of George Jacobs Sr. begins.
  • August 4 – The Court of Oyer and Terminer hears testimony from witnesses.
  • August 5 — George Jacobs Sr. is convicted by the jury.
  • August 19 — George Jacobs Sr. is hanged.

John Proctor

Proctor was born in Suffolk, England around 1631–32. He emigrated to Massachusetts with his family about three years later and they settled in Ipswich. In 1666, Proctor moved to Salem and leased a large farm of 700 acres. Two years later, he established a tavern near Salem Village — Proctor Tavern — which was successful and made him wealthy. 

Prior to being accused of witchcraft, Proctor was critical of the afflicted girls and accused them of lying. Further complicating matters for Proctor is the fact that his servant, Mary Warren, was one of the afflicted girls. Warren started exhibiting symptoms and making claims soon after the hysteria started. However, many accounts indicate that Proctor physically beat Warren and she seemed to admit that she was lying. This seems to have turned the afflicted girls against Warren. Soon after, Proctor went on a business trip and Warren suddenly started seeing visions again and rejoined the afflicted girls in making accusations and testifying in the hearings. Over the course of the trials, Warren testified against both John Proctor and his wife, Elizabeth, which contributed to them being convicted by the jury.

Proctor was the first man to be accused of witchcraft, the first man to be convicted, and the first man to be executed.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim John Proctor:

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  • March 12 — Mary Warren, the servant of John and Elizabeth Proctor, claims to see the specter of Martha Corey. John Proctor tells her she is making things up and threatens to beat her if she continues.
  • April 11 — During testimony in the hearing of Elizabeth Proctor, Abigail Williams makes accusations against John Proctor and he is arrested.
  • April 12 — Proctor is questioned by the magistrates and is sent to the prison in Boston.
  • June 1 — He is transferred to the Salem jail to await trial. 
  • June 23 — Proctor writes a letter and sends it to Increase Mather and other ministers. He accuses the judges on the Court of Oyer and Terminer of being corrupt and asks for new judges or a change in venue. The ministers refuse to become involved in the trials.
  • August 2 — The Court of Oyer and Terminer hears the case of John Proctor. He is found guilty by the jury.
  • August 19 — John Proctor is hanged.

John Willard

Very little is known about the life of John Williard prior to the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria. Some accounts indicate he was born in Nashaway, Massachusetts — present-day Lancaster — around 1657. Willard married Margaret Wilkens, and her family did not approve. Sometime around 1690, Willard bought land in Village as an investment, parceled it, and sold it.

Willard served as a deputy and helped arrest some of the people who were accused early on. He resigned his position, in protest of what he believed were false accusations.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim John Willard:

  • April 23 — Ann Putnam Jr. accuses John Willard.
  • May 10 — A warrant is issued for John Willard. Constable John Putnam goes to arrest him and finds Willard has apparently fled.
  • May 15 — Thomas Fuller Jr. files a complaint against Willard and a second warrant is issued for his arrest.
  • May 16 — Willard is found in Lancaster, Massachusetts, farming on land he owns there.
  • May 17 — Constable John Putnam takes Willard to Salem Village.
  • May 18 — Willard is questioned by the Magistrates and held for trial.
  • June 1 — Willard is transferred from the Boston prison to Salem for trial.
  • August 2 — Willard appears before the Court of Oyer and Terminer. He is found guilty of the witchcraft charges.
  • August 19 — John Willard is hanged.

Facts About the Victim of September 19, 1692

Giles Corey

Giles Corey was born in Northampton, England in 1621 and emigrated to Massachusetts. He may have been living in Salem as early as 1640. He moved to Salem Village in 1659 and became a farmer. In 1684, he married Martha Panon. Corey was known to be violent and was accused of murder in 1676. He was fined for his offense and many people suspected he paid off the judges. These rumors damaged his reputation.

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  • April 13 — Ann Putnam, Jr. accuses Giles Corey of witchcraft.
  • April 18 — A warrant is issued, Corey is arrested, and he is questioned at Ingersoll’s Tavern.
  • June 18 — Corey is transferred from Boston to the Salem jail.
  • September 9 — Mercy Lewis testifies as a witness against Giles Corey. Corey is formally indicted on the charge of witchcraft but refuses to enter a plea.
  • September 18 — Corey is excommunicated from the Salem Village Church.
  • September 19 — Giles Corey dies. Chief Justice Stoughton instructs Sheriff George Corwin to subject Corey — who is 80 years old — to the ancient torture of “peine forte et dure,” commonly called ‘‘pressing.”

Facts About the Victims of September 22, 1692

Martha Corey

Martha Panon was born somewhere in New England around 1619–20. 20 years later, she gave birth to a child out of wedlock. In 1690, she married Giles Corey. Both of them were known to have been involved in disputes with people in Salem Village. When the witchcraft hysteria started, she was critical of the afflicted girls and accused them of lying.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim Martha Corey:

  • March 12 — Ann Putnam Jr. accuses Martha Corey of tormenting her.
  • March 20 — During church services, Abigail Williams accuses Martha Corey of moving around the church in her spectral form.
  • March 21 — Martha Corey is arrested and questioned by Magistrate Hathorne and Magistrate Corwin at the meeting house. She is sent to the Salem jail.
  • April 12 — She is transferred to the Boston prison.
  • June 18 — Corey is transferred back to the Salem jail for trial.
  • September 6 — Her case begins before the Court of Oyer and Terminer.
  • September 8 — The jury hears testimony in her case.
  • September 9 — More testimony is heard in her case.
  • September 10 — Martha Corey is found guilty by the jury and sentenced to hang.
  • September 11 — She is excommunicated by the Salem Village Church, but the vote is not unanimous.
  • September 22 — Martha Corey is hanged.

Mary Easty

Mary Towne was born in Yarmouth, England in 1634. She was the younger sister of Rebecca Nurse and Saray Cloyce, who were also accused of witchcraft during the Witchcraft Hysteria. She emigrated to Massachusetts with her sister and the rest of the family and settled near Salem Village. In 1651, the family moved to Topsfield. A few years later, Mary married Isaac Easty of Topsfield. They moved to Salem Village and her husband owned one of the largest farms in the area.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim Mary Easty:

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  • April 21 — John Putnam Jr., Benjamin Hutchinson, Thomas Putnam, and John Buxton file complaints against various people, including Mary Easty.
  • April 22 — Esty appears before the Magistrates in Salem Village. She is sent to prison and held for trial.
  • May 18 — After some of the afflicted girls stop accusing Easty, the Magistrates decide to release her from prison.
  • May 19 — Mercy Lewis says she is tormented by Mary Easty.
  • May 20 — Ann Putnam Jr. and Abigail Williams say they are attacked by Easty’s specter. Mercy Lewis says Easty has threatened to kill her. A new complaint is filed against Easty and she is arrested.
  • May 23 — Easty is questioned by the Magistrates. She is held for trial and sent to the Boston jail.
  • August 3 — The Grand Jury hears testimony in her case.
  • August 4 — The Grand Jury hears further testimony in her case.
  • September 6 — Mary Easty’s case goes before the Court of Oyer and Terminer.
  • September 9 — The judges receive a petition from Easty and Saray Cloyse. The women insist they are innocent, they critical of the evidence against them, and question the fairness of the trials.
  • September 10 — Despite her petition, Mary Easty is found guilty by the jury and sentenced to death. The same day, she writes a petition to Governor William Phips, the court, and the minister. She insists the court must stop allowing the afflicted girls to testify together as a group so that “no more innocent blood may be shed.” She refused to admit to the charges against her, even though it means she will hang.
  • September 22 — Mary Easty is hanged.

Alice Parker

Very little is known about Alice Parker, other than she was married to John Paker, who worked as a fisherman. They rented a house on English Street in Salem Town. There is speculation that she was related to Giles Corey, and may have been his daughter or stepdaughter.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim Alice Parker:

  • January 12 — Alice Parker is found unconscious, lying on the ground in Salem Town. A man picks her up, but she remains unconscious. She is carried to her home and laid on her bed. At some point, she wakes, sits straight up, and starts laughing.
  • May 6 — Margaret Jacobs makes accusations against Parker.
  • May 11 — Jacobs recants her allegations, but the Magistrates suspect she is lying.
  • May 12 — The Magistrates hear testimony about Alice Parker. A warrant is issued for her arrest. She is arrested and taken in for questioning. Parker is held for trial and sent to jail in Boston.
  • June 1 — Parker is transferred back to Salem for trial.
  • June 2 — She is inspected for “witch’s marks.”
  • September 6 — The Court of Oyer and Terminer hears her case.
  • September 7 — The Grand Jury hears testimony in her case. New allegations are made against her by Mary Warren and Mary Walcott.
  • September 10 — Alice Parker is found guilty by the jury and sentenced to hang.
  • September 22 — Alice Parker is hanged.

Mary Parker

Mary Ayer was born around 1637. Her family was most likely from England and emigrated to Massachusetts. They settled in Haverhill in 1647. In 1652, when she was around 15 years old, she married Nathan Parker. Most of the records associated with Mary Parker’s case have been lost.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim Mary Parker:

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  • September 1 — Accusations are made against Mary Parker.
  • September 2 — Parker is arrested and questioned by the Magistrates in Salem Town.
  • September 7 — The court hears depositions about her case.
  • September 13 — At some point during the week of September 13, Mary Parker’s case is tried by the Court of Oyer and Terminer. Her trial may have been held on September 16.
  • September 17 — Parker is found guilty by the jury and sentenced to death.
  • September 22 — Mary Parker is hanged.

Ann Pudeator

Nothing is known about the early life of Ann Pudeator. She married Thomas Greenslit and they had five children. After Thomas died, Ann married Jacob Pudeator. Jacob died in 1682. Her son, Thomas Greenslit, testified against George Burroughs during the trials, but not until after Burroughs was executed. Some accounts claim Greenslit testified in an effort to help clear the charges against his mother.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim Ann Pudeator:

  • May 12 — The first accusations are made against Ann Pudeator. A warrant is issued for her and she is arrested. She is questioned by the Magistrates and sent to Boston to be held for trial.
  • June 18 — Pudeator is transferred from Boston to Salem for trial.
  • July 2 — The Salem Magistrates hear testimony in her case and she testifies on her behalf. They hold decide to hold her for trial.
  • September 6  — The Court of Oyer and Terminer hears Ann Pudator’s witchcraft case
  • September 7 — The Grand Jury hears testimony in Pudeator’s case.
  • September 10 — She is found guilty of the witchcraft charges and sentenced to death. Like Mary Easty, Pudeator petitions the court and criticizes the judges for allowing what she believes is false testimony.
  • September 22 — Ann Pudeator is hanged.

Wilmot Redd

Wilmot Redd, whose maiden name appears to be unknown, was from Marblehead. Her husband, Samuel Redd, was a fisherman. 

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim Wilmot Redd:

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  • Mary 26 — Accusations are made against her by some of the girls in Salem Village.
  • May 28 — John Holten and Jonathan Walcott file an official complaint against Wilmot Redd of Marblehead.
  • May 29 — Even though it is Sunday, Redd is arrested in Marblehead.
  • May 31 — She is questioned by the Magistrates in Salem and held for trial.
  • September 13 — Wilmot Redd’s case is heard before the Court of Oyer and Terminer.
  • September 14 — The Grand Jury hears testimony in Redd’s case.
  • September 17 — Wilmot Redd is found guilty of the charges against her and sentenced to death.
  • September 22 — Wilmot Redd is hanged.

Margaret Scott

Margaret Stevenson was born in England and emigrated to Massachusetts with her family. In 1642, she married Benjamin Scott. Benjamin died in 1671 and their small estate was left to Margaret. However, over the course of 20 years, she grew poor and became a beggar. It made her unpopular in the town of Rowley, where she lived. Most of the records related to Scott’s accusations, hearings, and trial are lost.

Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim Margaret Scott:

  • April 12 — Accusations are made against Margaret Scott. At some point, she is arrested.
  • August 5 — Scott is questioned in Salem Town and held for trial.
  • September 13 — Her case is heard before the Court of Oyer and Terminer.
  • September 15 — The Grand Jury hears testimony in Margaret Scott’s case.
  • September 17 — Scott is found guilty of the charges against her and sentenced to death.
  • September 22 — Margaret Scott is hanged.

Samuel Wardwell

Samuel Wardwell was born on May 16, 1643, in Boston, Massachusetts. In 1664, he moved to Salem, met a woman, married her, and had a son. However, she died and he moved to Andover with his son. In 1673, he married a widow, Sarah Hawkes, and they bought a large farm in Andover.

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Important facts about the witchcraft trial of victim Samuel Wardwell:

  • August 31 — Accusations are made against Samuel Wardwell.
  • September 1 — Wardwell is arrested in Andover and taken to Salem Town. He is questioned by the Magistrates and admits to having signed the Devil’s Book and tormenting Martha Sprague.
  • September 13 — His case is heard before the Court of Oyer and Terminer. His confession is read before the Grand Jury, but Wardwell changes his testimony and says he lied.
  • September 14 — The Grand Jury hears more testimony in his case. His history of fortune-telling is discussed at length.
  • September 17 — Wardwell is found guilty of the charges against him and sentenced to death.
  • September 22 — Samuel Wardwell is hanged.
Salem Witch Trials, Memorial to Victims
Photo by Francis Helminski. Cropped and resized from original. License.

Suggested Reading About the Victims of the Salem Witch Trials

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Citation Information

The following information is provided for citations.

  • Article Title Victims of the Salem Witch Trials
  • Coverage 1692
  • Author
  • Keywords Salem Witch Trials, Salem Witchcraft Hysteria
  • Website Name American History Central
  • Access Date December 2, 2022
  • Publisher R.Squared Communications, LLC
  • Original Published Date
  • Date of Last Update October 10, 2022

Victims of the Salem Witch Trials is Part of the Following on AHC

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