Black and white photo of the Stone House Tavern.

The Stone House Tavern was used as a hospital after both battles at Bull Run. [Library of Congress]

Second Battle of Bull Run Facts

August 28–30, 1862

Key facts about the Second Battle of Bull Run.

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Also Known As

  • Second Battle of Manassas
  • Battle of Second Bull Run
  • Battle of Second Manassas

Date and Location

  • August 28–30, 1862
  • Near the town of Manassas Junction, Virginia.

Campaign

Principal Confederate Commanders

Principal Union Commanders

Union Forces Engaged

  • Army of Virginia.

Confederate Forces Engaged

  • Army of Northern Virginia.

Number of Union Soldiers Engaged

  • Roughly 70,000.

Number of Confederate Soldiers Engaged

  • Roughly 55,000.

Estimated Union Casualties

  • 14,452 casualties (1,747 killed, 8,452 wounded, and 4,253 missing).

Estimated Confederate Casualties

  • 9,474 casualties (1,553, 7,812, and 109 missing).

Result

  • Confederate victory.

Significance

  • The Second Battle of Bull Run has several names because the Federals frequently named battles for creeks or rivers that played a role in the fighting, while Confederates used the names of nearby towns or cities.
  • The Confederate victory at the Second Battle of Bull Run paved the way for the South’s first invasion of the North.
  • The Second Battle of Bull Run was the eighth bloodiest battle of the Civil War in terms of casualties.
  • James Longstreet’s counterattack on August 30, 1862, during the Second Battle of Bull Run, included more Confederate troops than the more famous Pickett’s Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg (30,000 vs. 13,000)
  • During the Second Battle of Bull Run, the 5th New York Volunteer Infantry (Duryee Zouaves) suffered the highest number of combat deaths of any regiment in any one battle during the Civil War. In roughly 10 minutes of combat 117 men out of 490 were killed or mortally wounded on August 30, 1862.
  • Five Union soldiers were awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for gallantry displayed at the Second Battle of Bull Run.
  • Major General Fitz John Porter was court-martialed for his inactions on August 29, 1862, during the Second Battle of Bull Run. He was cashiered from the army in January 1863. A court of inquiry restored his commission on March 19, 1879.
  • Confederate General Robert E. Lee was grazed by a bullet on August 29, 1862, and he suffered more serious injuries in a fall from his horse after the battle, on August 31.
  • While no generals were killed at the Second Battle of Bull Run, three Union generals, and six Confederate generals were seriously wounded.
  • On September 7, 1862, the U.S. War Department issued General Orders, 128, announcing that Major General John Pope had been transferred to command of the Department of the Northwest, as of September 6, 1862.
  • After the Second Battle of Bull Run, Major General John Pope never held another combat command during the Civil War.
  • On September 12, 1862, the U.S. War Department issued General Orders, No. 129, ending the existence of the Army of Virginia.
  • After the Second Battle of Bull Run, Confederate General Robert E. Lee concentrated his Army of Northern Virginia in the Shenandoah Valley, and on September 4, he invaded Maryland.

Timeline of the Northern Virginia Campaign

These are the main battles and events of the Northern Virginia Campaign in order.

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Citation Information

The following information is provided for citations.

  • Article Title Second Battle of Bull Run Facts
  • Coverage August 28–30, 1862
  • Author
  • Website Name American History Central
  • Access Date July 28, 2021
  • Publisher R.Squared Communications, LLC
  • Original Published Date
  • Date of Last Update March 14, 2021
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