Portrait of Richard S. Ewell.

Lieutenant General Richard Ewell’s victory at the Second Battle of Winchester cleared the upper Shenandoah Valley of Union resistance, paving the way for Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. [Wikimedia Commons]

Second Battle of Winchester Facts

June 13–15, 1863

Key facts about the Second Battle of Winchester (June 13 – June 15, 1863), which cleared the upper Shenandoah Valley of Union resistance, paving the way for Robert E. Lee's invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania.

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Date and Location

  • June 13-15, 1863
  • Frederick County, near Winchester, Virginia

Campaign

Principal Union Commanders

  • Brigadier General Robert Milroy

Principal Confederate Commanders

  • Lieutenant General Richard Ewell

Union Forces Engaged

  • 2nd Division, 8th Corps, Middle Department, garrisoned at Winchester

Confederate Forces Engaged

  • 2nd Corps (Army of Northern Virginia)

Number of Union Soldiers Engaged

  • Roughly 6,900

Number of Confederate Soldiers Engaged

  • Roughly 19,000

Union Casualties

  • 3,000-4,000+ (95 killed, over 300 wounded, 3,000 to 4,000 captured/missing)

Confederate Casualties

  • 269 (47 killed, over 219 wounded, 3 missing)

Result

  • Confederate victory

Significance

  • The decisive action during the Second Battle of Winchester took place on June 15, 1863, near Stephenson’s Depot, roughly five miles northeast of Winchester, Virginia.
  • Confederate forces captured 23 pieces of artillery, 300 loaded wagons, more than 300 horses, and quite a large amount of commissary and quartermaster’s stores at the Second Battle of Winchester.
  • The Confederate victory at the Second Battle of Winchester cleared the upper Shenandoah Valley of Union resistance, paving the way for Robert E. Lee’s invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania.
  • Ewell’s victory at the Second Battle of Winchester enhanced his reputation in his first test as a corps commander following the death of Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson at the Battle of Chancellorsville.
  • Following his defeat at the Second Battle of Winchester, Union commander Robert Milroy was arrested and later tried and acquitted by a Union military court of inquiry.
  • Following his defeat at the Second Battle of Winchester, Union commander Robert Milroy did not command men in battle again until December 1864.

Timeline of the Gettysburg Campaign

These are the main battles and events of the Gettysburg Campaign in order.

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Citation Information

The following information is provided for citations.

  • Article Title Second Battle of Winchester Facts
  • Coverage June 13–15, 1863
  • Author
  • Keywords Second Battle of Winchester, Gettysburg Campaign, Civil War
  • Website Name American History Central
  • Access Date August 2, 2021
  • Publisher R.Squared Communications, LLC
  • Original Published Date
  • Date of Last Update March 14, 2021
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