Stamp Act Congress External Links

October 7, 1765–October 25, 1765

External Links for Stamp Act Congress

Disclaimer: If you click on any of the links below, you will leave American History Central. We do not not certify the accuracy of information, nor endorse points of view expressed on the site to which you are navigating.

Resolutions of the Stamp Act Congress

Transcript of Resolutions of the Stamp Act Congress

Stamp Act Congress

In many areas of the American colonies, opposition to the looming Stamp Act was taking the form of violence and intimidation. A more reasoned approach was taken by some elements. At the urging of James Otis, usually in the radical forefront, the Massachusetts assembly sent a circular letter to the other colonies, which called for an intercolonial meeting to plan tempered resistance to new tax.

Stamp Act Congress

"No taxation without representation!" was the cry. The colonists were not merely griping about the Sugar Act and the Stamp Act. They intended to place actions behind their words. One thing was clear — no colony acting alone could effectively convey a message to the king and Parliament. The appeals to Parliament by the individual legislatures had been ignored. It was James Otis who suggested an intercolonial conference to agree on a united course of action. With that, the STAMP ACT CONGRESS convened in New York in October 1765.

Stamp Act Congress

In many areas of the American colonies, opposition to the looming Stamp Act was taking the form of violence and intimidation. A more reasoned approach was taken by some elements. At the urging of James Otis, usually in the radical forefront, the Massachusetts assembly sent a circular letter to the other colonies, which called for an intercolonial meeting to plan tempered resistance to new tax.

The Stamp Act Congress

On the day appointed by Massachusetts for the meeting of the First Colonial Congress, committees from nine colonies met in New York. Various reasons prevented the others from joining.

Stamp Act Congress

STAMP ACT CONGRESS was the first official intercolonial gathering of the revolutionary era. The Stamp Act Congress met in New York City between 7 October and 24 October 1765. Much more than the Albany Congress of 1754, it pointed toward union among white colonial people in the face of external threat, portending the First Continental Congress (1774), the Second Continental Congress (1775–1781), the Articles of Confederation (1781–1789), and debates about the U.S. Constitution (1787–1788).

Stamp Act Congress

assembly of delegates from nine of the American colonies, convened in October 1765 at New York City to protest against the STAMP ACT, (q.v.). Held in response to an invitation sent to all 13 colonies by Massachusetts, the congress comprised representatives of Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Connecticut, Maryland, and South Carolina. The delegates expressed the opposition of the colonists to the oppressive Stamp Act in three documents: a Declaration of Rights and Grievances, an address to the king, and a group of petitions to both houses of the British Parliament. Although the congress recognized the authority of Parliament, its petitions were refused for formal consideration by the House of Commons as coming from an unauthorized body.

Stamp Act Congress

The Stamp Act Congress, which met in New York City from October 7 to 25, 1765, was the first gathering of representatives from several American colonies to devise a unified protest against British taxation. The congress adopted petitions to the British government spelling out the colonial grievances that would eventually lead to the Revolution while simultaneously laying the groundwork for future cooperation between the colonies. It was the forerunner of the Continental Congresses that would meet nearly a decade later to coordinate resistance to British polices.

Stamp Act Congress

Stamp Act Congress, assembly of delegates from nine of the American colonies, convened in October 1765 at New York City to protest against the Stamp Act. Held in response to an invitation sent to all 13 colonies by Massachusetts, the congress comprised representatives of Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Connecticut, Maryland, and South Carolina. The delegates expressed the opposition of the colonists to the oppressive Stamp Act in three documents: a Declaration of Rights and Grievances, an address to the king, and a group of petitions to both houses of the British Parliament. Although the congress recognized the authority of Parliament, its petitions were refused for formal consideration by the House of Commons as coming from an unauthorized body.

Citation Information

The following information is provided for citations.

  • Article Title Stamp Act Congress External Links
  • Coverage October 7, 1765–October 25, 1765
  • Author
  • Keywords stamp act congress
  • Website Name American History Central
  • URL
  • Access Date March 29, 2020
  • Publisher R.Squared Communications, LLC
  • Original Published Date
  • Date of Last Update January 13, 2018

Study Guides for the 2020 AP Exam

Get the study guides for history and U.S. politics from Amazon.com and get ready for your 2020 AP exams!

GET THE BEST OF AMERICAN HISTORY CENTRAL DELIVERED TO YOUR INBOX!
SIGN UP
By signing up for this email, you are agreeing to receive news, offers, updates, and additional information from R.Squared Communications, LLC and American History Central. Easy unsubscribe links are included in every email.
CLOSE [X]