Stamp Act2018-01-13T21:21:08+00:00

Stamp Act External Links

March 22, 1765

External Links for Stamp Act

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The Stamp Act, March 23, 1765

Transcript of the Stamp Act, March 23, 1765

An Act Repealing the Stamp Act; March 18, 1766

Transcript of an act repealing the Stamp Act, March 18, 1766

Resolutions of the Stamp Act Congress

Transcript of Resolutions of the Stamp Act Congress

Connecticut Resolutions on the Stamp Act: December 10, 1765

Transcript of the Connecticut Resolutions on the Stamp Act: December 10, 1765

Virginia Stamp Act Resolutions

Transcript of the Virginia Stamp Act Resolutions introduced by Patrick Henry

William Pitt's Defense of the American Colonies

Transcript of William Pitt's speech in Parliament denouncing the Stamp Act.

A Summary of the 1765 Stamp Act

The Stamp Act was passed by the British Parliament on March 22, 1765. The new tax was imposed on all American colonists and required them to pay a tax on every piece of printed paper they used. Ship's papers, legal documents, licenses, newspapers, other publications, and even playing cards were taxed. The money collected by the Stamp Act was to be used to help pay the costs of defending and protecting the American frontier near the Appalachian Mountains (10,000 troops were to be stationed on the American frontier for this purpose).

Stamp Act

The Stamp Act of 1765 (short title Duties in American Colonies Act 1765; 5 George III, c. 12) was a tax imposed by the British Parliament on the colonies of British America. The act required that many printed materials in the colonies carry a tax stamp. The purpose of the tax was to help pay for troops stationed in North America following the British victory in the Seven Years' War. The British government felt that the colonies were the primary beneficiaries of this military presence, and should pay at least a portion of the expense.

Britain, America and the 1765 Stamp Act

240 years ago Parliament passed an Act which was, perhaps, the single most important piece of Parliamentary legislation to have affected British-American relations. The Stamp Act of 1765 is so significant in this context that many see it as the spark that lit the touch paper leading to the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War only ten years later in 1775, and ultimately to the recognition of American independence.

Stamp Act

As part of an effort to defray the burgeoning expense of running the empire, Parliament passed the Stamp Act in March 1765. The law was to become effective in the colonies on November 1 and was announced by Prime Minister George Grenville many months in advance; he expressed a willingness to substitute another revenue-raising measure if a more palatable one could be found.

Stamp Act

Stamp Act, 1765, revenue law passed by the British Parliament during the ministry of George Grenville. The first direct tax to be levied on the American colonies, it required that all newspapers, pamphlets, legal documents, commercial bills, advertisements, and other papers issued in the colonies bear a stamp. The revenue obtained from the sale of stamps was designated for colonial defense; while the means of raising revenue was novel, the application of such revenue to defense continued existing British policy. The act was vehemently denounced in the colonies by those it most affected: businessmen, merchants, journalists, lawyers, and other powerful persons.

The Stamp Act Controversy

When Parliament passed the STAMP ACT in March 1765, things changed. It was the first direct tax on the American colonies. Every legal document had to be written on specially stamped paper, showing proof of payment. Deeds, wills, marriage licenses — contracts of any sort — were not recognized as legal in a court of law unless they were prepared on this paper. In addition, newspaper, dice, and playing cards also had to bear proof of tax payment. American activists sprang into action.

The Stamp Act

On February 6th, 1765 George Grenville rose in Parliament to offer the fifty-five resolutions of his Stamp Bill. A motion was offered to first read petitions from the Virginia colony and others was denied. The bill was passed on February 17, approved by the Lords on March 8th, and two weeks later ordered in effect by the King. The Stamp Act was Parliament's first serious attempt to assert governmental authority over the colonies. Great Britain was faced with a massive national debt following the Seven Years War. That debt had grown from £72,289,673 in 1755 to £129,586,789 in 1764*. English citizens in Britain were taxed at a rate that created a serious threat of revolt.

Stamp Act

Stamp Act 1765, revenue law passed by the British Parliament during the ministry of George Grenville. The first direct tax to be levied on the American colonies, it required that all newspapers, pamphlets, legal documents, commercial bills, advertisements, and other papers issued in the colonies bear a stamp. The revenue obtained from the sale of stamps was designated for colonial defense; while the means of raising revenue was novel, the application of such revenue to defense continued existing British policy. The act was vehemently denounced in the colonies by those it most affected: businessmen, merchants, journalists, lawyers, and other powerful persons.

To Tax Or Not To Tax: The Rights and Justification of Parliament in Question

As Americans, most of us view eighteenth-century England as a tyrannical power across the ocean, and see men like George Washington as heroes who fought against the oppressor. If history and wars were that simple, everyone would understand them, and the need for wars would be diminished. The truth is, England was not the least bit tyrannical to the colonies. Actually, the rebels had no idea, nor any intention of establishing a new and separate government "of the people, by the people, and for the people." They only meant to make a statement and attempt to avoid every tax that Parliament could dream up in the process.

Stamp Act of 1765

The Stamp Act of 1765 was legislation passed by the British Parliament that caused enormous outcry in America until it was repealed a year later, setting in action a chain of taxes and imperial overreach that caused the Americans to revolt in 1775. The new law required that all legal documents, customs papers, commercial contracts, newspapers, almanacs, wills, pamphlets and playing cards in the American colonies be taxed. A special tax stamp was affixed to show the tax was paid; lawsuits and newspapers were hardest hit--a small matter in Britain where lawsuits and newspapers were far less common than in the colonies.

Stamp Act

The last of the measures inaugurating the new colonial system sparked the greatest organized resistance. Known as the "Stamp Act," it provided that revenue stamps be affixed to all newspapers, broadsides, pamphlets, licenses, leases or other legal documents, the revenue (collected by American customs agents) to be used for "defending, protecting and securing" the colonies.

The Stamp Act

The Stamp Act, sponsored by George Grenville, was the first direct tax imposed by Britain on its American colonies. To help cover the cost of maintaining troops in the colonies, Parliament levied a tax on legal and commercial documents as well as printed material such as newspapers and pamphlets, all of which had to carry a special stamp. Benjamin Franklin and other American agents in London offered alternative measures, but conceded the need for revenue from America.

Stamp Act

Following the French and Indian War, England wanted the American colonies to help pay the costs of maintaining a standing army in America. In March 1765, Parliament passed the Stamp Act. It required that a stamp be purchased and placed on all printed material such as newspapers and pamphlets, as well as legal documents and even playing cards. It was the first direct tax on the imposed on the colonies.

The Stamp Act

George Grenville knows that the Sugar Act won't generate enough revenue in the colonies, and so he instructs his secretary in the Treasury, Thomas Whately, to draft legislation for a new tax. This duty will require that a wide range of legal and trade documents, as well as newspapers and even dice, carry official stamps. Whately makes inquiries about conditions in America, assuring his correspondents that he wants to devise a A Tax Not Too Burdensome.

Stamp Act

The Stamp Act was the English act of 1765 requiring that revenue stamps be affixed to all official documents in the American colonies. In 1765 the British Parliament, under the leadership of Prime Minister George Grenville, passed the Stamp Act, the first direct tax on the American colonies. The revenue measure was intended to help pay the debt incurred by the British in fighting the French and Indian War (1754–63) and to pay for the continuing defense of the colonies. Unexpectedly and to Parliament's great surprise, the Stamp Act ignited colonial opposition and outrage, leading to the first concerted effort by the colonists to resist Parliament and British authority. Though the act was repealed the following year, the events surrounding the tax protest became the first steps towards revolution and independence from England.

Stamp Act

act introduced by the British prime minister George Grenville and passed by the British Parliament in 1765 as a means of raising revenue in the American colonies. The Stamp Act required all legal documents, licenses, commercial contracts, newspapers, pamphlets, and playing cards to carry a tax stamp. The act extended to the colonies the system of stamp duties then employed in Great Britain and was intended to raise money to defray the cost of maintaining the military defenses of the colonies. Passed without debate, it aroused widespread opposition among the colonists, who argued that because they were not represented in Parliament, they could not legally be taxed without their consent.

Stamp Act

The last of the measures inaugurating the new colonial system sparked the greatest organized resistance. Known as the "Stamp Act," it provided that revenue stamps be affixed to all newspapers, broadsides, pamphlets, licenses, leases or other legal documents, the revenue (collected by American customs agents) to be used for "defending, protecting and securing" the colonies.

Stamp Act

The Stamp Act, passed by Parliament in March 1765, was designed to help defray the costs of maintaining British troops in the American colonies by requiring tax stamps for an extensive range of public documents, including newspapers, customs documents, legal papers, and licenses. The Seven Years' War had left Britain with a large national debt, and the government felt that since the colonies had benefited from the war—most notably from the expulsion of France from Canada—they should contribute to imperial expenses. The colonies, however, responded with outrage. They pointed to the expenses they had already incurred in the war and predicted that the new tax would exhaust their meager supply of hard money; their objections particularly focused on the constitutional issue. Few denied Parliament's right to regulate the colonies' external trade, but with the Stamp Act—as with the previous year's Sugar Act—Parliament was trespassing on the domain the colonial legislatures had long claimed as their own: the power to tax.

The Road to Independence

A general tax measure sparked the greatest organized resistance. Known as the "Stamp Act," it required all newspapers, broadsides, pamphlets, licenses, leases, and other legal documents to bear revenue stamps. The proceeds, collected by American customs agents, would be used for "defending, protecting, and securing" the colonies.

The Stamp Act and Other Acts

No crisis had yet been reached. Otis and Henry had each made more than a local reputation at the expense of British authority, and they had both won. The writs of assistance had fallen stillborn, and the king had yielded in the Parson's Cause. A shadow was thus cast over the royal prerogative, but it was not threatening; American loyalty was too deep-seated to be seriously shaken by such trifles. But greater events were soon to follow.

Parliamentary taxation of colonies, international trade, and American Revolution, 1763-1775

Soon after Parliament passed the Currency Act, Prime Minister Grenville proposed a Stamp Tax. This law would require colonists to purchase a government-issued stamp for legal documents and other paper goods. Grenville submitted the bill to Parliament for questioning, and only one member raised objections to Parliament's right to tax the colonies.

The Stamp Act of 1765

In 1764 the sugar-duties were somewhat reduced, as a boon to the colonies, but new duties were imposed on articles which had hitherto been imported free; at the same time, Lord Grenville proposed a new impost in the form of a stamp-tax. All pamphlets, almanacs, newspapers, all bonds, notes, leases, policies of insurance, together with all papers used for legal purposes, in order to be valid were to be drawn on stamped paper, to be purchased only from the king's officers appointed for that purpose. This plan met with the entire approbation of the British Parliament, but its enactment was deferred until the following year, in order that the colonies might have an opportunity of expressing their feelings on the subject. Though deference was thus apparently paid to their wishes, the intention of the British government was no longer concealed. The preamble of the bill openly avowed the intention of raising revenue from "his majesty's dominions in America;" the same act gave increased power to the admiralty courts, and provided more stringent means for enforcing the payment of duties and punishing their evasion.

The Stamp Act

Led by radicals such as Samuel Adams and James Otis, opposition to the Sugar Act was significant, but limited. In fact, there were many indications such opposition was fading. But Prime Minister George Grenville breathed new life into the protest movement, when he introduced the Stamp Act.

Citation Information

The following information is provided for citations.

  • Article Title Stamp Act External Links
  • Coverage March 22, 1765
  • Author
  • Keywords stamp act
  • Website Name American History Central
  • URL
  • Access Date June 27, 2019
  • Publisher R.Squared Communications, LLC
  • Original Published Date
  • Date of Last Update January 13, 2018

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